COLLEGE SAVINGS 101

Savingforcollege.com

Will a high school part-time job help with college admissions?
http://www.savingforcollege.com/articles/will-a-high-school-part-time-job-help-with-college-admissions-750

Posted: 2015-04-03

by Ryan Hickey

Managing Editor of Peterson's & EssayEdge, Guest Contributor

Whether they’re saving for college or just looking to earn some pocket change, high school students should put a lot of thought into choosing part-time employment. Although it may seem like just a few insignificant hours per week, a part-time job can have a big impact on a student’s college application and could even influence their career path for years to come.

To determine their job search criteria, students should consider four key questions, making sure to answer “yes” at least once for any job they consider. Answer “yes” to all four? Sounds like a winner!

1. Does the company directly or indirectly offer scholarships and/or grants?

Many national and international businesses often offer scholarships to employees. Companies are proud of the scholarships that they offer, and you can typically find out more information online. Be sure to check if students must remain employed while in college in order to use the scholarship. Also, read the requirements to see if recipients are required to pursue a specific major or area of study to continue receiving the scholarship. Students who are interested in a job with a smaller firm or organization may want to ask if the business itself offers scholarships or if there are scholarships available through related professional organizations.

2. Is the job in the student’s area of interest?

Meeting this criteria can seem impossible to many high school students. How can someone get a job in their area of interest when they haven’t even started college? While it can be a reach, taking the extra time to find a part-time job in their field of interest can be deeply rewarding. Students will meet other people who share their interests and who can offer pro tips on getting through college. Even a job that is in a similar field but doesn’t offer the highest pay or requires grunt work can be better than a job that isn’t going to benefit a student’s ultimate career path. It’s far more motivating to know that their efforts will pay off down the road.

3. Will this job result in an expanded network?

The saying goes, “It’s not what you know but whom.” While you do need the right set of knowledge and skills, the saying is right in that only other people can champion you and promote you. If students can’t secure a job in their area of interest, it can be exceptionally useful to work with people who can help connect them with professionals in the field — they may even be able to offer strong letters of recommendation.

4. Does the job offer the chance to learn auxiliary skills?

Perhaps with the exception of assembly line workers, nobody does only one thing during the course of their workday. For the position in question, can a student learn and apply auxiliary skills that are important to their future career? For example, working in a bakery can help someone interested in graphic design to build skills regarding interacting with clients and marketing unique designs.




Ryan Hickey is the Managing Editor of Peterson's & EssayEdge and is an expert in many aspects of college, graduate, and professional admissions. A graduate of Yale University, Ryan has worked in various admissions capacities for nearly a decade, including writing test-prep material for the SAT, AP exams, and TOEFL, editing essays and personal statements, and consulting directly with applicants.






Managing Editor of Peterson's & EssayEdge, Guest Contributor

Whether they’re saving for college or just looking to earn some pocket change, high school students should put a lot of thought into choosing part-time employment. Although it may seem like just a few insignificant hours per week, a part-time job can have a big impact on a student’s college application and could even influence their career path for years to come.

To determine their job search criteria, students should consider four key questions, making sure to answer “yes” at least once for any job they consider. Answer “yes” to all four? Sounds like a winner!

1. Does the company directly or indirectly offer scholarships and/or grants?

Many national and international businesses often offer scholarships to employees. Companies are proud of the scholarships that they offer, and you can typically find out more information online. Be sure to check if students must remain employed while in college in order to use the scholarship. Also, read the requirements to see if recipients are required to pursue a specific major or area of study to continue receiving the scholarship. Students who are interested in a job with a smaller firm or organization may want to ask if the business itself offers scholarships or if there are scholarships available through related professional organizations.

2. Is the job in the student’s area of interest?

Meeting this criteria can seem impossible to many high school students. How can someone get a job in their area of interest when they haven’t even started college? While it can be a reach, taking the extra time to find a part-time job in their field of interest can be deeply rewarding. Students will meet other people who share their interests and who can offer pro tips on getting through college. Even a job that is in a similar field but doesn’t offer the highest pay or requires grunt work can be better than a job that isn’t going to benefit a student’s ultimate career path. It’s far more motivating to know that their efforts will pay off down the road.

3. Will this job result in an expanded network?

The saying goes, “It’s not what you know but whom.” While you do need the right set of knowledge and skills, the saying is right in that only other people can champion you and promote you. If students can’t secure a job in their area of interest, it can be exceptionally useful to work with people who can help connect them with professionals in the field — they may even be able to offer strong letters of recommendation.

4. Does the job offer the chance to learn auxiliary skills?

Perhaps with the exception of assembly line workers, nobody does only one thing during the course of their workday. For the position in question, can a student learn and apply auxiliary skills that are important to their future career? For example, working in a bakery can help someone interested in graphic design to build skills regarding interacting with clients and marketing unique designs.




Ryan Hickey is the Managing Editor of Peterson's & EssayEdge and is an expert in many aspects of college, graduate, and professional admissions. A graduate of Yale University, Ryan has worked in various admissions capacities for nearly a decade, including writing test-prep material for the SAT, AP exams, and TOEFL, editing essays and personal statements, and consulting directly with applicants.






 

Reset email successfully sent.
Please check your inbox.

Close
page loadtime mark

Advertisement


close