COLLEGE SAVINGS 101

Savingforcollege.com

Part One: Yup, college is a huge waste of money.
http://www.savingforcollege.com/articles/part-one-yup-college-is-a-huge-waste-of-money-813

Posted: 2015-07-29

by Kathryn Flynn

The average starting salary of Class of 2015 graduates with a bachelor's degree is expected to be just over $62,000, according to a study from the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That might not sound too bad, but consider that the average graduate in 2015 left college with around $35,000 in student loan debt. And with total student loan debt in the U.S. topping $1.2 trillion this year combined with tuition prices that are rising faster than inflation, many families are left wondering whether or not a college education is even worth the cost. What's more, many people feel that you don't even need a degree to achieve success!

Here's a great example of someone who gave college a try and wasn't too happy with the results. Next week, we'll feature post that supports the other side.

Let us know your thoughts. If completely disagree and would like to share your story, please contact me or tell us why in the comments below!

College is a waste of money!

By Daphne D. Williams, AAS, Honors BA, MPA & MBA

With all the defaults, and college loans that have destroyed my personal credit that I am diligently learning how to fix on YouTube – yes, college was a waste of my time. Perhaps one day having many college degrees will repay me for all the sleepless nights, lack of having a social life, budget meals, and staying up all night to write research papers.

Online education has saved me from being destitute. I am a well-educated African American woman in my early forties, and searching for work while in college and thereafter was beyond depressing along with draining.

RELATED: Why bother saving for college?

Once I got over myself, and stayed out of my own way while piling up the rejection letters, I figured there had to be more to life than the struggle of juggling recruiters who were intimidated and/or baffled by their famous questions "why aren't you working?" Hmmm… because NOBODY is willing to give me a chance, even with tons of experience. Between avoiding phone calls from Sallie Mae, debt collectors and my landlord, I moved back in with my mother (that alone was horrific to me - as it made me feel like a complete failure), but thank God I had wifi and a dream, thus turning to the Internet to find my way.

I've always been intrigued by small business owners, and with my love of teaching both women and teens entrepreneurship, I was amazed by what you could become within the online market space. Like my parents, most people advise their children to finish high school and get a good city, state or federal government job in order to have security.

Sadly, when we don't teach youth and young adults entrepreneurship we do them a disservice by teaching them to play in the sand boxes of life nicely - instead of realizing that life has no limits and truly isn't a box, and thus requires risks and taking responsibility for the way your life turns out. Within a viral world of opportunities that require consistent risks, strategies, drive and commitment to excellence it amazes me that entrepreneurship isn't taught in pre-school.

College was a waste of my time for me, especially if obtaining a "Good Job" or a "Great Career" that was supposed to position me to sustain my livelihood because it didn't happen like that for me. There are plenty of people I know with GED's, or even high school dropouts, that are building amazing programs, products and services as the leaders within their niche.

Most of these uneducated (as it relates to a college degree) people that have better jobs than those with multiple degrees are doing much better than highly educated, smart, experienced people. Needless to say although I did very well in college, it didn't serve much purpose for me unless of course you want to have a flashy content rich LinkedIn Profile, and that in itself is simply pathetic.

RELATED: 7 things you may not know about student loan repayment

As a creative visionary, and youth mentor, I will forever teach youth to listen to their parents and attend college, but do what you love on the side, thus making your side hustle your business, so you can eventually fire your boss. We all should have a side hustle whether it is freelance writing, creating crafty items to sell on ESTY, EBay, Amazon, and/or Self Publishing an EBook that teaches to reach others right where they are, and offers you a significantly successful passive income.

If had to do it all over again, I would have learned a trade like web design (self-taught) early on so I could have saved time on juggling my struggle of looking for work after graduating with HONORS and G.P.A of 3.8.

The best part about not working for someone is there is no cap. As an entrepreneur you're required to wear many hats that will pay you handsomely with, I am not limited by what I can do nor how much money I can make, and even with a college degree their are always some sort of stipulations and/or limits.

Unlike a job, entrepreneurship poses no limits, but rather great rewards if you're driven to become who you already are on purpose.

RELATED: 5 youngest Shark Tank Entrepreneurs


Daphne D. Williams, AAS, Honors BA, MPA & MBA in Media Management (2015) is an Entrepreneur because with all her degrees nobody would hire her, so she hired herself. The New York native is a Copywriter, Business Consultant, Self-Published Author, Webinar Instructor, Teen Speaker, Youth Mentor, Radio Show Host, and Life Coach, and within the New Economy her audiences finds her online as a Digital Publisher on www.DwriteWELL.com/Portfolio building brand equity.


The average starting salary of Class of 2015 graduates with a bachelor's degree is expected to be just over $62,000, according to a study from the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That might not sound too bad, but consider that the average graduate in 2015 left college with around $35,000 in student loan debt. And with total student loan debt in the U.S. topping $1.2 trillion this year combined with tuition prices that are rising faster than inflation, many families are left wondering whether or not a college education is even worth the cost. What's more, many people feel that you don't even need a degree to achieve success!

Here's a great example of someone who gave college a try and wasn't too happy with the results. Next week, we'll feature post that supports the other side.

Let us know your thoughts. If completely disagree and would like to share your story, please contact me or tell us why in the comments below!

College is a waste of money!

By Daphne D. Williams, AAS, Honors BA, MPA & MBA

With all the defaults, and college loans that have destroyed my personal credit that I am diligently learning how to fix on YouTube – yes, college was a waste of my time. Perhaps one day having many college degrees will repay me for all the sleepless nights, lack of having a social life, budget meals, and staying up all night to write research papers.

Online education has saved me from being destitute. I am a well-educated African American woman in my early forties, and searching for work while in college and thereafter was beyond depressing along with draining.

RELATED: Why bother saving for college?

Once I got over myself, and stayed out of my own way while piling up the rejection letters, I figured there had to be more to life than the struggle of juggling recruiters who were intimidated and/or baffled by their famous questions "why aren't you working?" Hmmm… because NOBODY is willing to give me a chance, even with tons of experience. Between avoiding phone calls from Sallie Mae, debt collectors and my landlord, I moved back in with my mother (that alone was horrific to me - as it made me feel like a complete failure), but thank God I had wifi and a dream, thus turning to the Internet to find my way.

I've always been intrigued by small business owners, and with my love of teaching both women and teens entrepreneurship, I was amazed by what you could become within the online market space. Like my parents, most people advise their children to finish high school and get a good city, state or federal government job in order to have security.

Sadly, when we don't teach youth and young adults entrepreneurship we do them a disservice by teaching them to play in the sand boxes of life nicely - instead of realizing that life has no limits and truly isn't a box, and thus requires risks and taking responsibility for the way your life turns out. Within a viral world of opportunities that require consistent risks, strategies, drive and commitment to excellence it amazes me that entrepreneurship isn't taught in pre-school.

College was a waste of my time for me, especially if obtaining a "Good Job" or a "Great Career" that was supposed to position me to sustain my livelihood because it didn't happen like that for me. There are plenty of people I know with GED's, or even high school dropouts, that are building amazing programs, products and services as the leaders within their niche.

Most of these uneducated (as it relates to a college degree) people that have better jobs than those with multiple degrees are doing much better than highly educated, smart, experienced people. Needless to say although I did very well in college, it didn't serve much purpose for me unless of course you want to have a flashy content rich LinkedIn Profile, and that in itself is simply pathetic.

RELATED: 7 things you may not know about student loan repayment

As a creative visionary, and youth mentor, I will forever teach youth to listen to their parents and attend college, but do what you love on the side, thus making your side hustle your business, so you can eventually fire your boss. We all should have a side hustle whether it is freelance writing, creating crafty items to sell on ESTY, EBay, Amazon, and/or Self Publishing an EBook that teaches to reach others right where they are, and offers you a significantly successful passive income.

If had to do it all over again, I would have learned a trade like web design (self-taught) early on so I could have saved time on juggling my struggle of looking for work after graduating with HONORS and G.P.A of 3.8.

The best part about not working for someone is there is no cap. As an entrepreneur you're required to wear many hats that will pay you handsomely with, I am not limited by what I can do nor how much money I can make, and even with a college degree their are always some sort of stipulations and/or limits.

Unlike a job, entrepreneurship poses no limits, but rather great rewards if you're driven to become who you already are on purpose.

RELATED: 5 youngest Shark Tank Entrepreneurs


Daphne D. Williams, AAS, Honors BA, MPA & MBA in Media Management (2015) is an Entrepreneur because with all her degrees nobody would hire her, so she hired herself. The New York native is a Copywriter, Business Consultant, Self-Published Author, Webinar Instructor, Teen Speaker, Youth Mentor, Radio Show Host, and Life Coach, and within the New Economy her audiences finds her online as a Digital Publisher on www.DwriteWELL.com/Portfolio building brand equity.


 

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