COLLEGE SAVINGS 101

Savingforcollege.com

Are college admissions officers checking out your profile?
http://www.savingforcollege.com/articles/are-college-admissions-officers-checking-out-your-profile-897

Posted: 2016-02-05

by Kathryn Flynn

According to a new survey from Kaplan Test Prep, today's college applicants should be careful what they post to Facebook and Instagram. Of the 400 admissions officers who participated in the study, 40 percent admitted that they check students' social media pages to try and learn more about them. That's four times more than the percentage who did so in 2008. And, if a student has something to hide, staying away from Twitter and Snapchat won't always help - 29 percent of admissions officers say they will Google a student's name for information.

But the extra search doesn't always mean they're looking for something bad. In fact, some candidates invite admissions officers to visit their social media page in order to showcase a particular talent or award. In fact, according to Kaplan, invitations like these are up 42 percent since last year.

And the results of social media searches are also split, with an equal amount of admissions officers claiming that their findings positively impacted a student's chances of getting into a college as those who found things that had a negative impact. Yariv Alpher, executive director of research at Kaplan Test Prep suggests playing it safe when it comes to sharing photos and thoughts online.

"What you post online may be used in your favor or against you, so it's important to think about what you share. When in doubt, the best strategy may be to keep it to yourself," Aplher says.

RELATED: 4 things to watch out for when applying to a top school

While not everyone will be subject to a cyber visit from their prospective college, there are certain items on an application that are likely to trigger one. According to the study, here are the most common reasons an admissions officer might try and find out more about a student online.

Interests in talents

Admissions officers may want to verify an applicant who claims to have a special talent, especially when it's related to the arts. If a student claims to be an artist, they expect to see their work showcased.

Verification of awards

Students who note distinguished awards on their application can expect to be Googled, especially if it's something out of the ordinary.

Criminal records or disciplinary action

A mention of something negative may trigger a further investigation from an admissions officer, so students who've been featured in their local police blotter should have an explanation ready about why it happened.

Scholarships

Before a school gives away money, they want to make sure they recipient deserves it, so students applying for scholarships should be extra cautious about their online profiles.

Admissions sabotage

When applying to college, keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Admissions officers sometimes receive anonymous tips about negative behavior, which will prompt further exploration into the student's personal life.

According to a new survey from Kaplan Test Prep, today's college applicants should be careful what they post to Facebook and Instagram. Of the 400 admissions officers who participated in the study, 40 percent admitted that they check students' social media pages to try and learn more about them. That's four times more than the percentage who did so in 2008. And, if a student has something to hide, staying away from Twitter and Snapchat won't always help - 29 percent of admissions officers say they will Google a student's name for information.

But the extra search doesn't always mean they're looking for something bad. In fact, some candidates invite admissions officers to visit their social media page in order to showcase a particular talent or award. In fact, according to Kaplan, invitations like these are up 42 percent since last year.

And the results of social media searches are also split, with an equal amount of admissions officers claiming that their findings positively impacted a student's chances of getting into a college as those who found things that had a negative impact. Yariv Alpher, executive director of research at Kaplan Test Prep suggests playing it safe when it comes to sharing photos and thoughts online.

"What you post online may be used in your favor or against you, so it's important to think about what you share. When in doubt, the best strategy may be to keep it to yourself," Aplher says.

RELATED: 4 things to watch out for when applying to a top school

While not everyone will be subject to a cyber visit from their prospective college, there are certain items on an application that are likely to trigger one. According to the study, here are the most common reasons an admissions officer might try and find out more about a student online.

Interests in talents

Admissions officers may want to verify an applicant who claims to have a special talent, especially when it's related to the arts. If a student claims to be an artist, they expect to see their work showcased.

Verification of awards

Students who note distinguished awards on their application can expect to be Googled, especially if it's something out of the ordinary.

Criminal records or disciplinary action

A mention of something negative may trigger a further investigation from an admissions officer, so students who've been featured in their local police blotter should have an explanation ready about why it happened.

Scholarships

Before a school gives away money, they want to make sure they recipient deserves it, so students applying for scholarships should be extra cautious about their online profiles.

Admissions sabotage

When applying to college, keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Admissions officers sometimes receive anonymous tips about negative behavior, which will prompt further exploration into the student's personal life.

 

Reset email successfully sent.
Please check your inbox.

Close
page loadtime mark

Advertisement


close