COLLEGE SAVINGS 101

Savingforcollege.com

5 simple ways to teach a young child about college
http://www.savingforcollege.com/articles/5-simple-ways-to-teach-a-young-child-about-college-922

Posted: 2016-4-15

by Heather Hamilton, Varsity Tutors

These days, preparing for higher education begins at an increasingly early age. While students were once introduced to college during their high school years, they are now prompted to explore it almost as soon as elementary school begins. While this is ultimately viewed as a net positive, it can feel burdensome to parents.

After all, how exactly do you talk about college with your kindergartner? Is third grade too young to begin discussing scholarships? Fortunately, there are a number of simple and fun ways to familiarize your child with the idea of going to college. Here are five to start with:

1. Attend local college sporting events

If your son or daughter is interested in sports (whether itís basketball, field hockey, golf, or swimming), supporting your local collegiate team can be a great way to introduce them to higher education. By attending sporting events, they can develop a feel for campus culture and student engagement opportunities, all while enjoying a favorite pastime.

RELATED: 11 myths and realities of scholarships

2. Explore mentorship programs

College students are often encouraged to participate in mentorship programs at their school and in the surrounding community. These types of programs allow young students to spend quality time with a solid role model who can answer questions they may have about college academics.

RELATED: Lacrosse or Kumon? Which activities best prepare a young child for college?

3. Get involved in your community

Many college students participate in community activities as part of college-sponsored philanthropic organizations. These events may include charitable drives, community education classes, fun runs, and so on. Participating in these activities with your child can be an excellent way to illustrate the positive effect that college students can have on their communities.

RELATED: How younger students can build a competitive profile for the Ivy League

4. Spend the day on a local campus

A college campus can be a great place for kids to explore. You could spend the day discovering new things in an arboretum or learning center, or simply taking a walk and enjoying the beautiful scenery. If your child grows attached to a particular campus, it might be a good opportunity to begin discussing if they want to go to college, it will take some discipline. This includes getting good grades and developing smart study habits, and for most families, saving money.

RELATED: More American families are saving for college with 529 plans

5. Attend academic and artistic offerings

If you have a college or university close to your home, the easy access to academic and artistic events is well worth capitalizing on. For instance, consider bringing your child to a theater or music performance, a guest lecture, or a reading. These types of events are typically free, and can prompt younger students to begin exploring their academic interests.

RELATED: 76 percent of families have college funds by first grade


Heather Hamilton is a contributing writer for Varsity Tutors, a live learning platform that connects students with personalized instruction to accelerate academic achievement.

These days, preparing for higher education begins at an increasingly early age. While students were once introduced to college during their high school years, they are now prompted to explore it almost as soon as elementary school begins. While this is ultimately viewed as a net positive, it can feel burdensome to parents.

After all, how exactly do you talk about college with your kindergartner? Is third grade too young to begin discussing scholarships? Fortunately, there are a number of simple and fun ways to familiarize your child with the idea of going to college. Here are five to start with:

1. Attend local college sporting events

If your son or daughter is interested in sports (whether itís basketball, field hockey, golf, or swimming), supporting your local collegiate team can be a great way to introduce them to higher education. By attending sporting events, they can develop a feel for campus culture and student engagement opportunities, all while enjoying a favorite pastime.

RELATED: 11 myths and realities of scholarships

2. Explore mentorship programs

College students are often encouraged to participate in mentorship programs at their school and in the surrounding community. These types of programs allow young students to spend quality time with a solid role model who can answer questions they may have about college academics.

RELATED: Lacrosse or Kumon? Which activities best prepare a young child for college?

3. Get involved in your community

Many college students participate in community activities as part of college-sponsored philanthropic organizations. These events may include charitable drives, community education classes, fun runs, and so on. Participating in these activities with your child can be an excellent way to illustrate the positive effect that college students can have on their communities.

RELATED: How younger students can build a competitive profile for the Ivy League

4. Spend the day on a local campus

A college campus can be a great place for kids to explore. You could spend the day discovering new things in an arboretum or learning center, or simply taking a walk and enjoying the beautiful scenery. If your child grows attached to a particular campus, it might be a good opportunity to begin discussing if they want to go to college, it will take some discipline. This includes getting good grades and developing smart study habits, and for most families, saving money.

RELATED: More American families are saving for college with 529 plans

5. Attend academic and artistic offerings

If you have a college or university close to your home, the easy access to academic and artistic events is well worth capitalizing on. For instance, consider bringing your child to a theater or music performance, a guest lecture, or a reading. These types of events are typically free, and can prompt younger students to begin exploring their academic interests.

RELATED: 76 percent of families have college funds by first grade


Heather Hamilton is a contributing writer for Varsity Tutors, a live learning platform that connects students with personalized instruction to accelerate academic achievement.

 

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